Book Announcement: The Japanese Economy

The Japanese Economy

Hiroaki Richard Watanabe

Although still the world’s third largest economy, Japan continues to feel the effects of the collapse of a massive asset price bubble in the early 1990s. In recent years further setbacks, including both the Asian and global financial crises, and the 2011 Fukushima earthquake, have only added to the economy’s difficulties and made its prospects under Abenomics at best mixed.

Hiroaki Richard Watanabe examines the ups and downs of Japan’s postwar economic history to offer an up-to-date and authoritative guide to the workings of Japan’s economy. The book highlights the country’s distinct business network and its unique state–market relationship. It explores the characteristic institutional complementarity that exists among different sectors and business practices and gives particular attention to human factors, such as labour market dualism, gender discrimination and migration. Although often associated in western minds with futuristic automated efficiency, Japan’s economy, Watanabe shows, retains many inefficient and peculiar practices that do not comply with global standards.

The book provides readers with a concise survey of Japan’s recent economic history, the economy’s characteristic features and the challenges it faces.

Contents

1 Introducing the Japanese Economy
2 The Transformation of the Japanese Economy since the 1990s
3 Measuring the Japanese Economy
4 The Structure of the Japanese Economy
5 The Human and Labour Factors of the Japanese Economy
6 A Distinctive Japanese Economic Feature: ‘Galapagos’ Syndrome
7 Conclusion: Prospects and Challenges for the Japanese Economy

For further information please visit:

https://www.agendapub.com/books/59/the-japanese-economy

http://cup.columbia.edu/book/the-japanese-economy/9781788210515

About Paula

Paula lives in the vortex of academic life. She studies medieval Japanese history.
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